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Ozette Lake Kayak Camping & Photography [Video]

Ozette Lake is Washington’s third largest natural lake, and is protected within the boundaries of Olympic National Park (although the forest has been logged right up to the Park boundary, sometimes just a few hundred feed from the lake’s eastern shore). I have always thought that Ozette Lake (also called Lake Ozette) would make a great sea kayak camping and photography trip. And so it was.

I launched from Swans Bay, at the northeast corner of the lake, circled around Garden Island, paddled south along the east shore and then crossed over to Tivoli Island. A clear sky and calm winds made the paddle easy. The excellent campsite on the northeast corner of the island was occupied, so I set up my camp on the island’s southwest corner at a nice wind-protected site behind a large fallen cedar. Here I wold spend four nights using Tivoli Island as a base-camp for exploring the whole south half of the lake.

Autumn leaves on shore of Lake Ozette, Olympic National Park, Washington
Autumn leaves on shore of Ozette Lake, Olympic National Park, Washington
Sony a7R IV and Sony 16-35mm f2.8 GM lens, f/16, 1.6 sec, ISO 100
Log fallen into Ozette Lake, Olympic National Park, Washington
Log fallen into Ozette Lake, Olympic National Park, Washington
Sony a7R IV and Sony 16-35mm f2.8 GM lens, f/11, 6 sec, ISO 100
Stars above log fallen into Ozette Lake, Olympic National Park, Washington
Stars above log fallen into Ozette Lake, Olympic National Park, Washington
Sony a7R IV and Sony 16-35mm f2.8 GM lens, f/2.8, 4 min, ISO 1600

Day 2

My second day was mostly cloudy and spent exploring the entire south end of Ozette Lake. I paddled to Cemetery Point and searched for the old abandoned cemetery just south of there. No luck. It is probably just overgrown.

Next I paddled to Allens Bay to find the old abandoned Allens Bay Trail that runs 2.1 miles from the lake to the Pacific Ocean. As I approached the trailhead, I spotted a deer along the shoreline. I drifted within 30 feet of the buck, while it just laid there looking away from me and into the woods. As I recorded a video clip and narrated the situation into the camera, it kept looking into the woods. I’m pretty sure that it was looking for me in the woods because “that’s where humans come from.” I think the notion of a human approaching from the water was novel to him.

Male black-tail mule deer on shore of Ozette Lake
Male mule deer on shore of Ozette Lake, looking for me in the woods (even though I’m on the lake only 30 feet behind it).
Sony a6600 and Sony E 70-350mm f/4.5-6.3 G OSS lens, f/6.3, 1/1000 sec, ISO 1600

I hiked down Allens Bay trail for about 1/3 mile, at which point the trail had deteriorated into a tunnel through the brush about 2-1/2 feet in diameter. Not wanting to crawl to the Pacific Ocean, I turned back to the kayak.

After paddling about 0.4 miles down Allens Creek, I continued my route around the south end of the lake, including a stop at Baby Island and down to South Creek.

Day 3

Day 3 was overcast with rain and wind in the forecast. A great day to spend in the forest.

So I paddled up to Ericsons Bay, found the Ericsons Bay Trail (officially called the South Sand Point Trail) and hiked it out to the Pacific Ocean. While the old boardwalks on the trail are in pretty bad shape, the old growth forest was excellent. A light rain started as I photographed western sword fern and western red cedar.

Western sword fern and western red cedar tree, Olympic National Park, Washington
Western sword fern and western red cedar tree, Olympic National Park, Washington
Sony a6600 and Sony 24-105mm f/4 G lens, f/16, 1 sec, ISO 400
Western sword fern and western red cedar trees line South Sand Point Trail, Olympic National Park, Washington
Western sword fern and western red cedar trees line South Sand Point Trail, Olympic National Park, Washington
Sony a6600 and Sony 24-105mm f/4 G lens, f/13, 1 sec, ISO 400

After returning to the kayak, I found a 20 knot wind coming out of the south on Ozette Lake. I attached my short towline to a deck-line on the boat (so the boat can’t blow away from me if I end up in the water) and started paddling south tight along the shoreline. The forest provided a great wind-break all the way to Cemetery Point, with only a short open water crossing to make back to Tivoli Island.

Day 4

With a beautiful sunrise and clear skies, I spent almost all of Day 4 photographing landscapes and shooting video on Tivoli Island. At sunset I paddled SSW to a spot on the lake shore I had scouted on Day 2. Here, a large candelabra cedar had fallen and overhung the shoreline. I shot stars above the old cedar framing Tivoli Island.

Tree on shore of Ozette Lake, Olympic National Park, Washington
Tree on shore of Ozette Lake, Olympic National Park, Washington
Sony a7R IV and Sony 16-35mm f2.8 GM lens, f/11, 1/20 sec, ISO 100
Branched dead tree on shore of Ozette Lake, Olympic National Park, Washington
Branched dead tree on shore of Ozette Lake, Olympic National Park, Washington
Sony a7R IV and Sony 16-35mm f2.8 GM lens, 6-stop ND filter, f/16, 8 sec, ISO 100
Nightscape of Tivoli Island framed by branches of fallen cedar tree overhanging Lake Ozette, Olympic National Park, Washington
Nightscape of Tivoli Island framed by branches of fallen cedar tree overhanging Lake Ozette, Olympic National Park, Washington
Sony a7R IV and Sony 16-35mm f2.8 GM lens, f/16, 34 min, ISO 1600

Day 5

Another beautiful clear-sky day … but unfortunately time to go home.

I paddled back along the east shore, exploring Boot Bay, Crooked Creek and Big River on the way back to the boat launch at Swan Bay.

In total, I paddled 35 miles and hiked 4 miles.

Wildlife sightings were not as profuse as I had hoped. I saw one deer, 6 loons, signs of river otter and about 20 belted kingfisher. The lake has many fallen trees overhanging its shoreline, making perfect habitat for the belted kingfisher. Perhaps I’ll return to Ozette Lake for a trip dedicated to just photographing these beautiful birds.

Google Earth map showing route paddled on Lake Ozette
Route paddled on Ozette Lake (Google Earth)

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Vesper Peak: Sunset Photography [Video]

Hiked up to the summit of Vesper Peak with my friend Randy to photograph sunset, the night sky and sunrise over the North Cascade Mountains.  Unfortunately, smoke from forest fires in Eastern Washington blew in, obscuring the night sky and sunrise.  But the sunset was magical.

Sunset over Washington's North Cascade Mountains from summit of Vesper Peak
Sunset over Washington’s North Cascade Mountains from summit of Vesper Peak
Sony a6600 and Sony 10-18mm f/4 lens

Here is a video of our ascent, climbing 4000 feet in 4.0 miles. We start on the rough Sunrise Mine trail, climb up to Headlee Pass and then continue over heather, snow and granite to the summit at 6214 feet, where we spent a pleasant night in bivy sacks.

An early stream crossing can be challenging when water levels are high. Those following the route to the summit of Vesper Peak should have good off-trail travel skills, including travel over steep snow and rock. Spikes, crampons and/or ice axe, and the skills to use them, may be require depending on conditions. Loose rocks on the switchbacks up to Headlee Pass can be dangerous to those below you. Take extra care here to avoid knocking rocks down the hill, and consider staying close together in a tight group so that any loosened rocks can’t build up dangerous speed before impacting people below. Medium to high clearance vehicle advised for the drive to the trailhead due to one washout.

Sunset over Washington's North Cascade Mountains from summit of Vesper Peak
Sunset over Washington’s North Cascade Mountains from summit of Vesper Peak
Sony a6600 and Sony 10-18mm f/4 lens
Climber overlooking Washington’s North Cascade Mountains from summit of Vesper Peak
Sony a6600 and Sony 10-18mm f/4 lens
Climber overlooking Washington's North Cascade Mountains from summit of Vesper Peak
Climber overlooking Washington’s North Cascade Mountains from summit of Vesper Peak
Sony a6600 and Sony E16-55mm f/2.8 lens

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Vesper Peak on WTA
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Gluten-Free Bannock Bread [Video]

Bannock bread is a favorite camping side dish with a long tradition. Made from all dry ingredients, it packs nicely, doesn’t require any refrigeration and makes a hearty side dish with dinner. Any left-overs can be added to the following day’s breakfast menu.  However, traditional bannock bread’s primary ingredient is wheat. So I wanted to figure out a gluten-free bannock bread variation that my wife could eat, given her gluten intolerance.

I made up my standard bag of bannock mix, but simply substituted spelt flour for wheat flower, one-for-one.

Bannock is easily cooked in the back-country by frying it in a pan or by baking it in a reflector oven. In the video linked above, I fry it in a pan over a twig stove.

The end result was pretty good. Not quite as good as traditional wheat bannock bread, but pretty acceptable … especially with a handful of raisins baked in and a dusting of cinnamon.

Spelt Bannock Bread Recipe

Mix following dry ingredients in 1 quart zip-lock freezer bag. I like to mass produce several of these and store them in the freezer for trips throughout the year.

• 1 cup spelt flour
• 1 Tbsp baking powder
• 3 Tbsp powdered milk
• 1/4 tsp salt
• 1/2 Tbsp brown sugar (optional)

Carry separately:
• 1 Tbsp butter, oil or ghee (see note on ghee below)
• Dash cinnamon (optional)
• Handful raisins, dried cranberries or fresh blueberries (optional, but very yummy!)

Ghee is a clarified butter that will remain fresh without refrigeration for several weeks when properly sealed. At home, it can be stored for months in the refrigerator. It is tastier and healthier than regular butter. I prefer Organic Valley brand. You can find it on Amazon https://amzn.to/3cH7PXG or in the Indian foods or dairy sections of your local grocery store.

Cooking Gluten-Free Bannock Bread in Camp

  1. In the field, add water to the bag of dry ingredients, a little at a time. Also add any optional raisins, dried cranberries or fresh blueberries. Mix the water into the dry ingredients by squeezing the sides of the bag with your hands. You are looking for a knead-able dough consistency. Don’t add too much water: it is easy to add water, but pretty difficult to take it back out!
  2. Melt a tablespoon of butter, oil of ghee in a pan. A heavy cast iron pan would be ideal, but a thinner lightweight pan will work fine in the back-country.
  3. Add the dough to the pan. Spread it out with a spoon or spatula to around 3/4 inch thick.
  4. Fry the dough over medium heat, until the first side is browned. This should take around 12-15 minutes. Cooking too fast can result in burned surfaces, but still doughy in the middle.
  5. Flip the loaf over, sprinkle some cinnamon over the just-cooked side (optional) and cook the second side for a similar amount of time.
  6. Probe for done-ness by sticking a toothpick, fork or knife into the bread. The probe should come out with no dough on it when the bread is done in the middle.
  7. Remove from heat and let the bread cool for a few minutes before breaking it into pieces with your hands (some consider it faux-pas to cut bannock bread with a knife). Enjoy.

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Gluten-free bannock bread prepared with ghee and cinnamon

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Saddlebag Island: Sea Kayak Camping & Spring Wildflowers [Video]

Join me on a sea kayaking camping adventure to Saddlebag Island Marine State Park to see its wildlife, explore its forests and to check out the spring wildflowers that grow along its rocky shoreline.

I paddle across Fidaldo Bay on a foggy May morning.  Following a series of compass bearings, I make my way from Anacortes to the SE tip of Guemes Island. From there, I hop across to Huckleberry Island, circle around the north end of Saddlbag Island, wrap around Dot Island and land in Saddlebag’s South Harbor.

After setting up camp at the Cascade Marine Trail site, I hike the rough 1.2 mile trail around the island. The spring wildflowers are out in full force this mid-May morning.

Spring wildflowers on shore of Saddlebag Island
Spring wildflowers on shore of Saddlebag Island

After encounters with about 40 seals hauled out on rocks, great blue heron, bald eagles and river otter, I witness a colorful sunset over Mount Baker and peaceful Padilla Bay.

Sunset of Saddlebag Island with Mount Baker and Cascade Mountains across Padilla Bay
Sunset of Saddlebag Island with Mount Baker and Cascade Mountains across Padilla Bay

I had the island to myself, except for a brief visit from a motor boat.

Saddlebag Island Marine State Park has 5 campsites scattered amongst the forest of Pacific madrone.  This including one Cascade Marine Trail campsite designated for guests arriving by wind- or human-powered watercraft. It is one of 66 campgrounds and 160 day-use sites available along the Cascadia Marine Trail system, running the full length of Puget Sound.

Pacific madrone forest, Saddlebag Island Marine State Park
Pacific madrone forest, Saddlebag Island Marine State Park

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Saddlebag Island Marine State Park
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Life Jacket Safety

Gear List for Multi-Day Packrafting Trips

packrafting equipment

Here is the packrafting gear list I use when packing for a typical week-long packrafting trip that primarily involves floating down a river without significant backpacking. Check out the videos at bottom of this page for examples of such trips.

For trips with significant backpacking, this packrafting gear list will need to be adapted. Much more weight optimization is required, often with some sacrifices in comfort. You will need to think more like an ultra-light backpacker, cut equipment to absolute minimum, use the lightest-weight version of each item you take and trim off every ounce possible. However, always wear an appropriate PFD, and always wear a whitewater helmet if rafting Class II or greater water.

Core Packrafting Gear List

  • Packraft:  I paddle the Alpacka Classic with removable whitewater deck.  My friends paddle the larger and slightly heavier Alpacka Expedition model.
  • Packraft Repair Kit:  The Alpacka rafts all come with a basic repair kit and.  We add TiZip Maintenance Kit, Spare Nozzle, Spare Valve Cap, Patch-n-Go Kit, Tenacious Tape, Tyvek Tape, Aquaseal and extra alcohol wipes.  Not everyone in a group needs to carry all of these items, but the group should have plenty of repair kit on longer expeditions.  Spare dry suit neck and wrist gaskets are also a good idea on a long trip.
  • Bow Bag:  24 L of easy access storage for lunch, water, sunscreen, bug repellant, binoculars, map, compass, gloves, hat and more.
  • Cargo Fly Internal Drybags:  These can pack a surprising amount of camping gear inside your raft, and attach to a clip inside the raft to keep them from shifting around.  My friends and I all use the Roll-Top version.  If you put anything hard in these (e.g. tent poles, stove), be sure to wrap it in something soft to avoid getting holes in the boat/bag when you bump into a rock on the water.
  • Paddle:  There are tons of options.  A paddle that breaks down into four sections could be important if you will be doing lots of backpacking with your packraft.  But a two section paddle works fine too.  I use a straight shaft Werner Ikelos paddle, for both packrafting and sea kayaking.  A high-angle paddle keeps the blade close to the side of the boat, which minimizes how much the packraft turns with each stroke, thus moving the boat faster with less energy.  I also suggest that one person in your party should carry a spare paddle if you are paddling in a remote area.
  • USCG Type III PFD:  I just use my sea kayaking PFD.  If you want an extra light-weight version, check out the Astral V-Eight.  Always carry a whistle and river knife (*) on your PFD.
  • Whitewater Helmet:  Something designed for white water is preferred.
  • Dry Suit:  Save some big bucks by buying this during one of those 20% off sales that REI has every year.
  • Throw Bag & Tow Rope:  A short tow rope is used for capturing your friend’s overturned boat if it gets separated from them.  It should attach to your waist and have a quick-release buckle so you can cut it away if it gets hung up on something.  You may also need a throw bag (*) on more serious white water.  I am using the Salamander Retriever Kayak Rescue Throw Rope & Tow Tether, which serves both purposes.  Hyperlite offers a super light-weight River Rescue Throw Bag.
  • Paddling Gloves:  I have the NRS Maverick, but I find that they wear out pretty fast and the latest version is too stiff.

*  I highly recommend taking a swift water rescue course to learn how to safely use this gear.

Clothing List

  • Socks:  3 pairs of wool socks.
  • Boots:  I’m a big fan of Chota wading boots over my dry suit feet.  They drain water quickly and dry out in camp with some sun or wind.  They are a killer combination with these waterproof submersible socks when not wearing a dry suit (e.g. flatwater canoeing trips).
  • Underwear:  3 pair, non-cotton.
  • Thermal Underwear Bottom:  1 pair under dry suit for paddling, 1 pair for sleeping.
  • Thermal Underwear Tops:  1 pair under dry suit for paddling, 1 pair for sleeping.
  • Hiking Pants:  Switch between full-length or shorts as temperatures change.  Get something tough that will stand up to sitting on rocks.  2 pair.  I love Northbound Gear’s “Adventure” water resistant pants for colder weather conditions ($20 off).
  • Shirts:  I typically take 1 short-sleeve and 1 long-sleeve non-cotton shirt.
  • Wool Sweater:  Wear under dry suit on cold days, or wear in camp in mornings/evenings.
  • Light Down Jacket:  For cold nights/mornings in camp.  Get something packable.  For an extra layer of protection, mine goes in a waterproof compression bag before packing it with the rest of my clothes.
  • Light Gloves:  For cold nights/mornings in camp.
  • Warm Hat:  For cold nights/mornings in camp.
  • Rain Jacket:  For rainy days in camp, if you want to get out of your dry suit.
  • Rain Pants:  For rainy days in camp, if you want to get out of your dry suit.
  • Rain Hat:  I’ve used the Seattle Sombrero for decades.  Lets your neck ventilate way more than a parka hood.  I tuck my parka hood inside my jacket to keep it dry, pulling it out only when its rainy AND windy.
  • Sun Hat:  The Seattle Sombrero can do, but I like a light-weight folding baseball-style hat.
  • Head Net:  Only necessary when in deep bug country.

Camping Equipment List

  • Backpack:  Not only necessary for backpacking with your gear, but also good for portaging all your stuff around rapids beyond your comfort zone.  But also great for getting your gear to/from the river, padding hard camping equipment within your packraft and even just keeping stuff organized in the car when you’re sharing a ride.  We mostly use 4400 cubic inch Southwest packs from Hyperlight Mountain Gear.
  • Tent:  Get something small and compact.  I use a Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL1.  My friends use something from Hyperlite Mountain Gear or Zpacks.
  • Sleeping Bag:  For an extra layer of protection, my bag goes in a waterproof compression bag before packing it with the rest of my camping gear it in a larger dry bag.
  • Sleeping Pad:  The Neoair is light and packs down small, but inflates to 2.5 inches thick.
  • Folding Camp Chair:  My chair’s legs dig into the sand.  I suggest trying something designed for soft ground, like the Helinox Ground Chair, or use one of their groundsheets.
  • Headlamp with extra set of batteries
  • Stove, Bowl, Cup, Spoon:  I’ll take a Jetboil for solo cooking, or an MSR Whisperlight and larger pot if sharing the stove.  For solo use of the Jetboil, I use about 25 g of fuel per day to boil one pot for breakfast and to boil 1.5 pots for dinner with about 15 minute simmer time.  However, to avoid burning fuel when a recipe call for simmering, I now put my pot in an insulated cozy for twice the simmer time.
  • Dromedary Bag:  If it is not safe to drink from the river (e.g. agriculture waste water), I use 10 L MSR Dromedary Bags.  I plan for 4 liters/day, plus a little extra.  See my video on drying these out inside.
  • Water Filter:  If it is safe to use water from the river, I like gravity filters, so I can do other camp chores while the gravity does its thing filtering my water.
  • Water Bottle:  I carry a 1/2 quart or 1 quart bottle in the bow bag for use while paddling.

Miscellaneous Equipment List

  • Trekking Poles:  Take them if you’re going to be doing any backpacking with all your gear, or if your tent requires them for support.  Otherwise, I would leave them at home.
  • Binoculars:  Definitely worth taking a small waterproof pair of binoculars if you’re floating through good wildlife habitat.  I carry a pair that is probably far too large, but the compact Nikon Trailblazer ATB Waterproof 10X25 looks like a good option.
  • Sunglasses
  • Sunscreen & Lip Balm
  • Insect Repellant
  • Maps:  Keep printed maps in a Ziploc freezer bag.  On my smartphone, I also carry topo maps on the Backcountry Navigator app, and other specialty maps in the Avenza Maps app.
  • Compass:  The Suunto MC-2G Navigator is my choice for precise navigation, but may be overkill for some.
  • Nature Guides:  I really like taking these laminated tri-fold nature guides with me for identifying wildlife, birds, wildflowers, plants, etc.  I take these on all my outdoor adventures.
  • Notebook:  Right in the Rain spiral bound is the way to go.
  • Personal Locator Beacon:  If I’m going somewhere really remote, I keep an ACR PLB in my PFD pocket.  The battery will need to be served every 5 years.  Others might prefer in inReach or SPOT for a connection to the outside world if you’re willing to pay a monthly fee.  I suggest that at least one person in your party should have one of these devices if padding in a remote area.
  • Toiletries
  • Smartphone:  Handy off-line apps include Clock (alarm clock), Backcountry Navigator (topo maps), Avenza Maps (specialty maps), PeakFinder (mountain identification), Merlin (bird identification), The Photographer’s Ephemeris (sun/moon positioning) and of course Music and the Camera.
  • Battery Bank and Charging Cables:  I use Anker 10,000 mAh Powercore II battery banks.
  • Solar Charging System:  May only be necessary on trips of 2 or more weeks in length.  I have a whole separate article and downloadable calculator on how to size a portable solar charging system here.
  • Poo Bags:  Many rivers require paddlers to carry out all of their human waste.  The Cleanwaste Go Anywhere bags work well.  But the included TP and hand sanitizer is a joke.  Carry your own bottle of hand sanitizer.  As a guy, I carry 1 roll of TP per week, plus 1 extra roll (women may need more).  Vacuum pack extra rolls to minimize bulk.  Put all of this stuff in a dedicated dry bag separate from everything else.
  • First-Aid Kit:  Everyone should carry a small first-aid kit sealed in a Ziploc freezer bag.  I suggest the group also carry a more extensive kit, depending on how remote the trip is.  And at least some in the party should be trained in Wilderness First Aid.
  • Fire Starter:  I use flint and steel (works when wet, never runs out of gas), but lighter or matches work.
  • Repair Kit:  In addition to the packraft-specific repair kit, the group should carry a repair kit with zip-ties, duct tape, spare sleeping pad valve, pliers, knife, etc.  A plastic peanut jar keeps my kit waterproof.
  • Emergency Shelter:  A compact space blanket could be carried in a PFD pocket if there is any risk of you getting separated from your gear and the rest of the group in a remote location.
  • Bear-Resistant Food Container:  Many rivers will require use of bear-resistant food containers.  I use both an Ursack and a BV450 BearVault for a one week trip.  Ursacks can be stowed inside the packraft all the way up in the bow.  Rigid canisters should be stored in the back to avoid impact with rocks.  Keep any canisters far from the river while in camp.  I’ve had raccoons knock them over at night causing the canister to roll towards the water.

I hope you find this packrafting gear list useful in planning your next packraft trip. Please share any suggested improvements to this packrafting equipment list in the comments below.

Here are a few videos of packrafting trips where I used this equipment list.

Grande Ronde River – 7 Days Minam to Heller Bar by Packraft & Canoe [Video]

We enjoyed paddling the Grande Ronde so much last year, that we just had to do it again this year, this time paddling 91 miles over 7 days from Minam, Oregon down the Wallowa and Grande Ronde Rivers to Heller Bar, Washington on the Snake River.

This National Wild and Scenic River offers tons of white water up to Class IV, including the following key rapids:

  • Minam Roller (II)
  • Red Rock Rapid (II)
  • Blind Falls (II)
  • Sheep Creek Rapid (II+)
  • Martin’s Misery (II)
  • Double Eddy Rapids
  • Upper Narrows (III)
  • Lower Narrows (IV)
  • Bridge Rapids (II+/III)

Four of us paddled Alpacka packrafts (Classic and Expedition models), and one paddled by canoe.

Water levels on the Grande Ronde Wild and Scenic River ranged from 4600-5400 cfs.

This trip in mid-April had greener hillsides, which brought out more wildlife than we saw last year in late-June. This year’s wildlife sightings included bald eagles, river otter, a band of bighorn sheep and hundreds of elk.

Logistics for Floating the Grande Ronde River

  • The BLM has excellent information on floating the river on their website and Boating Information PDF.
  • A boater’s permit is required to float the Wallowa and Grande Ronde River.  You can fill out the free self-serve permit available at the put-in.
  • Check the river’s flow forecast from NOAA.
  • The American Whitewater page for Grande Ronde Minam-Troy, Troy-Boggan’s Oasis and Boggan’s Oasis to Heller Bar have useful information.  We floated all three sections.  We only saw two other parties floating the river during the first 2 days.
  • American Whitewater recommends flows in the range 1000-13,000 cfs.  Our trip ranged 4400 to 4500 cfs.
  • The BLM publishes a detailed Boater’s Guide with detailed river maps.  You can purchase this at Minam Store, or BLM offices.  Or, download it to your phone here.
  • Some of the surrounding areas are agricultural and range land.  You should pack all of your drinking water.  I consumed about 3-4 liters/day.
  • You are required to carry out all human waste.  I used Cleanwaste GO Anywhere bags stored in a dry bag.  Bring additional TP and hand sanitizer to supplement the tiny amounts that comes in these bag.  Those with larger boats should consider carrying something similar to the Cleanwaste Go Anywhere Portable Toilet.
  • Campfires need to be contained in fire pans.  Be prepared to cook on stoves.
  • Bring binoculars to scout for wildlife up on the hills.  You could see mountain sheep, elk, deer, snake, eagles, sand pipers and lots of other birds.

Olympic National Park – A Winter Photo Shoot – Part 2 [Video]

I’m back at Olympic National Park this month, photographing the old-grown temperate rainforests in winter. This time I’m at the Queets River Rainforest and Ruby Beach. If you haven’t seen it yet, check out Part 1 in my Olympic National Park Winter Photo Shoot series.

Click on image below for larger view and to buy a print.

Queets River old-growth rainforest
Maple Grove, Quinault Rainforest
Queets River old-growth rainforest
Maple Grove, Quinault Rainforest
Red alder along bank of Queets River
Pony Bridge, East Fork Quinault River
Big leaf maple tree, Fairholme Campground
Sams River Loop Trail, Queets River Rainforest
Lower Queets River Road
Sams River Loop Trail, Queets River Rainforest
Twilight reflection, Ruby Beach
Queets River Rainforest
Ruby Beach
Sams River Loop Trail, Queets River Rainforest

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Northern Harrier Hunting Over Skagit Valley Farmland

Caught this northern harrier backlit by the rising sun while hunting on Fir Island.

Northern harrier (Circus hudsonius) in flight hunting over Skagit Valley farmland during sunrise.
Northern harrier (Circus hudsonius) in flight hunting over Skagit Valley farmland during sunrise.
Northern harrier (Circus hudsonius) hunting over wetland, Fir Island, Washington
Northern harrier hunting over wetland, Fir Island, Washington
Northern harrier (Circus hudsonius) in flight hunting over wetland, Fir Island, Washington
Northern harrier hunting over wetland, Fir Island, Washington

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Olympic National Park – A Winter Photo Shoot [Video]

Some pics and a video tour from my four-day winter camping photo shoot in Olympic National Park photographing in the Hoh River rain forest, the Queets River rainforest and Ruby Beach.

Click on image below for larger view and to buy a print.

Queets River old-growth rainforest
Queets River old-growth rainforest
Red alder along bank of Queets River
Red alder along bank of Queets River
Big leaf maple tree, Fairholme Campground
Big leaf maple tree, Fairholme Campground
Lower Queets River Road
Lower Queets River Road
Queets River rainforest
Sun peeking into the Queets River rainforest
Twilight reflection, Ruby Beach
Twilight reflection, Ruby Beach
Ruby Beach
A fine day at Ruby Beach

Resources

Photography Equipment

For landscapes:

For wildlife:

Related Posts

Thanks for reading and thank you for your support!


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